Of the Green Family from Harpole, Northamptonshire their Ancestors and Relatives

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Wednesday, 22 November 2017 10:12 PM GMT

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The Green Family of Harpole

Our updated family tree is now on this website here.

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Shabby Genteel at Brackley Antique Cellar

The success of Brackley Antiques Cellar continues and has led to new areas of the Cellar opening up and hence much more for you to see on your visits.
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Everything Old is New Again

'Art Deco Style' as a popular term, really came into regular usage during the 1960's, during the revival of interest in the style it represented and remains in use today. 

 

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Subsidence in Victorian Buildings - More

This article describes how Victorians built foundations for buildings on swampy soils. I hope methods have improved since then. "Foundations of Buildings in Swampy Soil" from Cassell's Technical Educator.

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Sanitary Engineering in Victorian Times written c1870

Cisterns and Economy of Water - Ventilation of Pipes

We now proceed to give the detail of various inventions for storing and also for economising the supply of water. In the last century cisterns were almost invariably made of lead, in some cases cast solid of sufficient thickness to be fixed without external casing; the outside was often decorated with panelling in designs, and sometimes with coats of arms. The usual mode, however, was to provide a strong wooden cistern, which was subsequently lined with lead soldered together at the angles, either cast in sheets or rolled in a mill, described in the first case as "cast" and in the latter as "milled" lead; and this latter system is still extensively in use.

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Some Thoughts on the Antiques and Collectables Trade

Visitors to us aren't always looking for expensive antiques. They are mainly looking for yesteryear collectables and older solid furniture to replace laminated chipboard. Dealers respond to customers demands; Victorian and Edwardian pine chests and furniture are bought, restored and sold. If an item is sold we start looking for similar items and a trend is set.

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Thoughts on Commercial Subjects By Benjamin Franklin

OF EMBARGOES UPON CORN, AND OF THE POOR

In inland countries, remote from the sea, and whose rivers are small, running from the country, and not to it, as is the case of Switzerland, great distress may arise from a course of bad harvests, if public granaries are not provided and kept well stored. Anciently, too, before navigation was so general, ships so plenty, and commercial transactions so well established, even maritimecountries might be occasionally distressed by bad crops. But such is now the facility of communication between those countries, that an unrestrained commerce can scarce ever fail of procuring a sufficiency for any of them. If indeed any government is so imprudent as to lay its hands on imported corn, forbid its exportation, or compel its sale at limited prices, there the people may suffer some famine from merchants avoiding their ports. But wherever commerce is known to be always free, and the merchant absolute master of his commodity, as in Holland, there will always be a reasonable supply.

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Victorian Brick and Tile Making

by Gilbert R. Redgrave from Cassell's Technical Educator. (Written in the late 19th century.)
COPING BRICKS - MOULDED BRICKS - GAUGED BRICKS - TILES - ROOFING AND DRAIN TILES.


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Victorian Bricks, Tiles and Terra Cotta

by Gilbert R. Redgrave from Cassell's Technical Educator. (Written in the late 19th century.)

The manufacture of flooring tiles has, we think, made greater progress during the present century than any other branch of the ceramic art; and this industry as now practised in Staffordshire, presents many features of great interest, and differs in many respects from the manufacture of the coarser wares we have noticed in our previous chapters. The old fashioned 9 inch or 12 inch tiles made in wooden moulds in the same way as bricks are made, have now been almost entirely superseded by the thin machine made tile, which has scarcely one point in common with its clumsy prototype.

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A Century of Flight

The first powered flight took place 100 years ago. The advances in materials, engines and design in that time have been phenomenal.

Aircraft from before the First World War don't bear much resemblance to the aircraft we travel in today and they are well worth seeing if you have any interest in how design has changed. Aircraft design has affected design of many everyday items such as the streamlined look of 50's and 60's household appliances and cars.

Aircraft design advanced exceptionally fast in the first 15 years due to the First World War. Our pictures show a Bristol Box Kite from before that war and a triplane from that War.

To find out more about celebrations of 100 years of flight visit the 100 years of flight home page.

To see more of our early aircraft a visit to the Shuttleworth Trust at Old Warden in Bedfordshire is a very good day out and this year there are more flying days than ever before.

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