Of the Green Family from Harpole, Northamptonshire their Ancestors and Relatives

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Wednesday, 22 November 2017 10:17 PM GMT

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Principles of Design - Hardware (continued). by Christopher Dresser

In ironwork the manifestation of a true constructive principle is beyond all things desirable. Iron, being a strong material, should not be formed into heavy masses unless immense weight has to be sustained or very great strength is required. If we form lamps, candelabra, and such works of iron, it is obvious that the portions of metal employed in their construction may be thin, as the material is of great strength. Were we to form such works of wood, then a greatly increased thickness of material would be necessary, in order that the same strength be secured, as wood is not nearly so strong as iron.

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Principles of Design - Hardware by Christopher Dresser

Having considered metal work in its more costly branches, we come to the consideration of hardware; and I am glad that we have reached that part of our subject which deals with inexpensive materials, for they are those which must be generally employed, while works formed of the precious metals can be used only by comparatively few persons. The object of art is the giving of pleasure. If as an artist I give pleasure, I do to an extent fulfil my mission; but I do so perfectly only when I give the greatest amount of the most refined pleasure by my art that it is possible for me to give. If by producing works which can be procured by many I give pleasure, it is well that I do so; but if the many fail to derive pleasure from my works, then I must address myself to the few, and be content with my lesser mission. Education appears to be necessary to the appreciation of all art; the artist then, is a man who appeals to the educated.

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Concerning the Dissentions between Britain and America

Letter from Benjamin Franklin (to Mr Dubourg)in London October 2nd 1770 on taxation and representation.
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Silversmiths Work Part 3 by Christopher Dresser

Having chosen a form for a vessel, the next question with which we have to deal is, will it require a handle and spout? It is curious that while the position of a spout and handle in relation to a vessel is governed by a simple natural law, we yet rarely find them placed as they should be. Consideration must also be given to any form of decoration on the surface of the object.
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Principles of Design in Glass (continued) by Christopher Dresser

Principles of Design. - XXV.By Christopher Dresser, PH.D., F.L.S., ETC. - Glass - from Cassell's Technical Educator. There is one thing pertaining to table-glass that we do not now sufficiently consider, which is its capacity for colour. Our one idea in the formation of glass vessels is the imitation of crystal, unless we happen to produce a vessel of the strongest tint. With the exception of hock glasses, which are generally either ruby colour, dark green or intense yellow-green, we rarely employ tinted glass on our tables.
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Sketch of an English School by Benjamin Franklin c1750

Written for the Consideration of the Trustees of the Philadelphia Academy. It is expected that every Scholar to be admitted into this School, be at least able to pronounce and divide the Syllables in Reading, and to write a legible Hand. None to be received that are under Years of Age.
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The Way to Make Money Plenty in Every Man's Pocket.

At this time, when the general complaint is that - "money is scarce," it will be an act of kindness to inform the moneyless how they may reinforce their pockets. I will acquaint them with the true secret of money-catching - the certain way to fill empty purses - and how to keep them always full. Two simple rules, well observed, will do the business.
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Necessary Hints to Those That Would be Rich by Benjamin Franklin 1763

The use of money is all the advantage there is in having money.
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Silversmiths' Work Part 2 by Christopher Dresser

There are various modes of working metal. It may be cast, hammered, cut, engraved, and manipulated in various ways.
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Silversmiths Work - Part 1 by Christopher dresser

The need for silver and gold items to be designed using a minimum of material due to the high value of the material. Principles of Design - XXVI by Christopher Dresser PHD FLS etc from Cassell's Technical Educator.
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