Of the Green Family from Harpole, Northamptonshire their Ancestors and Relatives

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Saturday, 24 February 2018 03:48 AM GMT

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Thoughts on Commercial Subjects By Benjamin Franklin

OF EMBARGOES UPON CORN, AND OF THE POOR

In inland countries, remote from the sea, and whose rivers are small, running from the country, and not to it, as is the case of Switzerland, great distress may arise from a course of bad harvests, if public granaries are not provided and kept well stored. Anciently, too, before navigation was so general, ships so plenty, and commercial transactions so well established, even maritimecountries might be occasionally distressed by bad crops. But such is now the facility of communication between those countries, that an unrestrained commerce can scarce ever fail of procuring a sufficiency for any of them. If indeed any government is so imprudent as to lay its hands on imported corn, forbid its exportation, or compel its sale at limited prices, there the people may suffer some famine from merchants avoiding their ports. But wherever commerce is known to be always free, and the merchant absolute master of his commodity, as in Holland, there will always be a reasonable supply.

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Victorian Brick and Tile Making

by Gilbert R. Redgrave from Cassell's Technical Educator. (Written in the late 19th century.)
COPING BRICKS - MOULDED BRICKS - GAUGED BRICKS - TILES - ROOFING AND DRAIN TILES.


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Victorian Bricks, Tiles and Terra Cotta

by Gilbert R. Redgrave from Cassell's Technical Educator. (Written in the late 19th century.)

The manufacture of flooring tiles has, we think, made greater progress during the present century than any other branch of the ceramic art; and this industry as now practised in Staffordshire, presents many features of great interest, and differs in many respects from the manufacture of the coarser wares we have noticed in our previous chapters. The old fashioned 9 inch or 12 inch tiles made in wooden moulds in the same way as bricks are made, have now been almost entirely superseded by the thin machine made tile, which has scarcely one point in common with its clumsy prototype.

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A Century of Flight

The first powered flight took place 100 years ago. The advances in materials, engines and design in that time have been phenomenal.

Aircraft from before the First World War don't bear much resemblance to the aircraft we travel in today and they are well worth seeing if you have any interest in how design has changed. Aircraft design has affected design of many everyday items such as the streamlined look of 50's and 60's household appliances and cars.

Aircraft design advanced exceptionally fast in the first 15 years due to the First World War. Our pictures show a Bristol Box Kite from before that war and a triplane from that War.

To find out more about celebrations of 100 years of flight visit the 100 years of flight home page.

To see more of our early aircraft a visit to the Shuttleworth Trust at Old Warden in Bedfordshire is a very good day out and this year there are more flying days than ever before.

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Principles of Design - Hardware (continued). by Christopher Dresser

In ironwork the manifestation of a true constructive principle is beyond all things desirable. Iron, being a strong material, should not be formed into heavy masses unless immense weight has to be sustained or very great strength is required. If we form lamps, candelabra, and such works of iron, it is obvious that the portions of metal employed in their construction may be thin, as the material is of great strength. Were we to form such works of wood, then a greatly increased thickness of material would be necessary, in order that the same strength be secured, as wood is not nearly so strong as iron.

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Principles of Design - Hardware by Christopher Dresser

Having considered metal work in its more costly branches, we come to the consideration of hardware; and I am glad that we have reached that part of our subject which deals with inexpensive materials, for they are those which must be generally employed, while works formed of the precious metals can be used only by comparatively few persons. The object of art is the giving of pleasure. If as an artist I give pleasure, I do to an extent fulfil my mission; but I do so perfectly only when I give the greatest amount of the most refined pleasure by my art that it is possible for me to give. If by producing works which can be procured by many I give pleasure, it is well that I do so; but if the many fail to derive pleasure from my works, then I must address myself to the few, and be content with my lesser mission. Education appears to be necessary to the appreciation of all art; the artist then, is a man who appeals to the educated.

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Concerning the Dissentions between Britain and America

Letter from Benjamin Franklin (to Mr Dubourg)in London October 2nd 1770 on taxation and representation.
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Silversmiths Work Part 3 by Christopher Dresser

Having chosen a form for a vessel, the next question with which we have to deal is, will it require a handle and spout? It is curious that while the position of a spout and handle in relation to a vessel is governed by a simple natural law, we yet rarely find them placed as they should be. Consideration must also be given to any form of decoration on the surface of the object.
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Principles of Design in Glass (continued) by Christopher Dresser

Principles of Design. - XXV.By Christopher Dresser, PH.D., F.L.S., ETC. - Glass - from Cassell's Technical Educator. There is one thing pertaining to table-glass that we do not now sufficiently consider, which is its capacity for colour. Our one idea in the formation of glass vessels is the imitation of crystal, unless we happen to produce a vessel of the strongest tint. With the exception of hock glasses, which are generally either ruby colour, dark green or intense yellow-green, we rarely employ tinted glass on our tables.
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Sketch of an English School by Benjamin Franklin c1750

Written for the Consideration of the Trustees of the Philadelphia Academy. It is expected that every Scholar to be admitted into this School, be at least able to pronounce and divide the Syllables in Reading, and to write a legible Hand. None to be received that are under Years of Age.
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