Of the Green Family from Harpole, Northamptonshire their Ancestors and Relatives

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Saturday, 21 October 2017 10:07 PM BST

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I am trying to document everything I can find on my Family History. I am now having a close look at my Liddiard tree and adding more details to the family story. The Liddiards are also associated with Kings of Harwell and I'm trying to ascertain how all these Kings are related.

If you should want to join me in the quest to find the story of my ancestors please contact me with details, of how you fit into my Family Tree, and I will give you access to do this. Anyone else can freely view most material on people who are no longer living and contribute to the more general stories. You can comment on anything on this web site without logging in.

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The Green Family of Harpole

Our updated family tree is now on this website here.

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Thoughts on Commercial Subjects By Benjamin Franklin

OF EMBARGOES UPON CORN, AND OF THE POOR

In inland countries, remote from the sea, and whose rivers are small, running from the country, and not to it, as is the case of Switzerland, great distress may arise from a course of bad harvests, if public granaries are not provided and kept well stored. Anciently, too, before navigation was so general, ships so plenty, and commercial transactions so well established, even maritimecountries might be occasionally distressed by bad crops. But such is now the facility of communication between those countries, that an unrestrained commerce can scarce ever fail of procuring a sufficiency for any of them. If indeed any government is so imprudent as to lay its hands on imported corn, forbid its exportation, or compel its sale at limited prices, there the people may suffer some famine from merchants avoiding their ports. But wherever commerce is known to be always free, and the merchant absolute master of his commodity, as in Holland, there will always be a reasonable supply.

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Concerning the Dissentions between Britain and America

Letter from Benjamin Franklin (to Mr Dubourg)in London October 2nd 1770 on taxation and representation.
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Sketch of an English School by Benjamin Franklin c1750

Written for the Consideration of the Trustees of the Philadelphia Academy. It is expected that every Scholar to be admitted into this School, be at least able to pronounce and divide the Syllables in Reading, and to write a legible Hand. None to be received that are under Years of Age.
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The Way to Make Money Plenty in Every Man's Pocket.

At this time, when the general complaint is that - "money is scarce," it will be an act of kindness to inform the moneyless how they may reinforce their pockets. I will acquaint them with the true secret of money-catching - the certain way to fill empty purses - and how to keep them always full. Two simple rules, well observed, will do the business.
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Necessary Hints to Those That Would be Rich by Benjamin Franklin 1763

The use of money is all the advantage there is in having money.
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Public Transport

Will Public Transport ever become popular again?
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Advice to a Young Tradesman c1748

An essay by Benjamin Franklin. Remember that time is money. He that can earn ten shillings a day by his labour, and goes abroad, or sits idle one half of that day, though he spends but sixpence during his diversion or idleness, ought not to reckon that the onle expense; he has really spent, or rather thrown away, five shillings besides. Remember that credit is money. If a man lets his money lie in my hands, after it is due, he gives me the interest, or so much as I can make of it during that time. this amounts to a considerable sum where a man has good and large credit, and makes good use of it.
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Bottle Bank

When I was a child the bottles we got our 'pop' in had a 3d deposit on them. Does anyone know when this system stopped. Perhaps it could be reintroduced.
Collecting bottles used to be a good way of supplementing ones pocket money.
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