Of the Green Family from Harpole, Northamptonshire their Ancestors and Relatives

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Tuesday, 12 December 2017 06:16 AM GMT

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I am trying to document everything I can find on my Family History. I am now having a close look at my Liddiard tree and adding more details to the family story. The Liddiards are also associated with Kings of Harwell and I'm trying to ascertain how all these Kings are related.

If you should want to join me in the quest to find the story of my ancestors please contact me with details, of how you fit into my Family Tree, and I will give you access to do this. Anyone else can freely view most material on people who are no longer living and contribute to the more general stories. You can comment on anything on this web site without logging in.

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William Spackman of Eastbury - his Will 1898

William was my Great Grandfather. William made his will in April 1898 and it looks as though he didn't expect to live long. He lived on until May 1916 in asylums (hospitals) until May 1916.

More can be seen about William's Life here.

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Elizabeth Spackman of Calne - Her Will

 Elizabeth died on 1st June 1798 aged 78 and was buried at Clyffe Pypard on 5th June 1798. She is not on my Family Tree.

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Thomas Spackman of Wroughton - his Will

 Thomas made his will on 23 October 1847 and died the next day. His full details can be seen here.

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Peter Spackman of Compton Bassett - his Will

 Peter died 8th July 1794 at Nolands Compton Bassett. He was my 5 x Great Grandfather. His full details can be seen here.

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William Spackman of Cherhill - his Will

 I believe William was my 6xg Grandfather. He died in  October 1758. His full details can be seen here..

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Land held by Richard Spackman in Broadtowne in 1656

 The following is from Abstracts of Wiltshire Inquisitions Post Mortem returned in the court of chancery in the reign of King Charles I.

I assume Broadtowne is Broad Town which was in Clyffe Pypard parish but now a parish in it's own right.

 

 

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William Seager of Highway Wiltshire - his Will

 William was my 4 xg grandfather, his grand daughter Elizabeth Seager married William Spackman in 1842.

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William Spackman of Clyffe Pypard - his Will - 1614.

 William is believed to be my 9Xg grandfather. His full details can be seen here.

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Henry Spackman of Clyffe Pypard - his Will - 1581

 Henry is believed to be my 10 x g grandfather. Hopefully this will will help in proving this or otherwise. See more about Henry here.

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Henry Spackman of Corsham - his Will

 Henry was my gggg uncle. I have not managed to find details of his daughters. He died in a fire.

The Western Flying Post, Sherborne and Yeovil Mercury - 27 January 1849 - Corsham - Destructive Fire and Loss of Life.
Between five and six o'clock on Wednesday morning, the house in occupation of Mr Spackman, grocer and draper, of Corsham, was discovered to be on fire, and within an hour or two the whole of the premises, together with the extensive stock in trade, account books, furniture &c was one heap of ruins, and Mr Spackman himself a corpse! so much of his body having been consumed by the fire that it was impossible to identify it! The accident, it is supposed, either originated in the back parlour, where there had been a fire on the previous evening, or in the stove leading from the shop into the chimney of the room. Mr Spackman's attention was first called to it by a suffocating smell; he immediately alarmed the family, who, with himself, effected their escape into the street, - the Misses Spackman, who slept at the back part of the house, getting through a trap-door into the adjoining premises. The drum ‎(the usual means of calling the inhabitants together)‎ quickly sounded the alarm, and assistance was soon procured. Within a few minutes the town engine was at work, and another engine was brought from Chippenham; every possible exertion, indeed, was used, but for a long time without effect. The flames spread to the adjoining house, occupied by Mrs T Hulbert, which was also destroyed, together with a large portion of Mrs Hulbert's furniture. Shortly after the engines began to play, there was a tremendous explosion from a quantity of gunpowder which was on the premises, but fortunately without injury to any one. From the combustible nature of the materials, the flames extended across the street, and did damage to the windows of the premises occupied by Miss Fowler and Dr Dyke; and it was only by extraordinary exertion that these premises were saved from destruction, large flakes of fire flying to a considerable distance. Naturally anxious to save some portion of his property, Mr Spackman unfortunately re-entered the house, after the fire had obtained considerable ascendancy, and proceeded to his bedroom, where some valuable papers were kept; but the flames quickly burst forth from the back parlour door, at the foot of the staircase, and prevented his descent. His nephew, at the time, was in the back bedroom, and hearing him apparntly gasping for breath, called upon him to follow him - the nephew at the moment leaping through the window into the garden below. It was to no purpose however. Mr S must have been instantly overpowered by suffocation, and his body was afterwards found immediately under the spot where the floor gave way. His arms were on his chest; but his feet were completely burnt from his legs; and in this state his remains were taken to the Market house, where an Inquest will be held. Mr Spackman was a widower, but has left a large family. His stock, which was valuable, was insured in the Sun Fire Office; but, nevertheless, the loss will be considerable. - The deceased was a zealous member of the Baptist denomination, and has left a family of three children, and a large circle of friends, who deeply mourn his loss. This very shocking affair has cast a gloom over the whole neighbourhood, and will not be soon forgotten by those who witnessed the calamity.

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